This educational collaboration between Washington University's Tyson Research Center and the Missouri Botanical Garden's Shaw Nature Reserve is designed to engage St. Louis area high school students in scientifically-based exploration of the natural world. Linked programs of field training (SIFT) and field research (TERF) provide teenagers with experiences that realistically reflect research in environmental biology. Participating teens learn a variety of field investigation skills and then have the opportunity to put those new skills to work assisting career scientists with real research projects.

Monday, October 21, 2013

The TERF posters are ready to go!

There are a record number of TERF posters entered in the WUSTL Fall 2013 Undergraduate Research Symposium!  It will be very exciting to see the TERFers discuss their projects with the public on Saturday, October 26.

Ben Banet, Saint Louis University High School '14
Study of box turtles in St. Louis urban and suburban environments indicates significant differences in home ranges
Mentor: Dr. Stephen Blake, visiting scientist, Biology Department

Maddy Herries, Nerinx Hall '14
Adam Rangwala, Clayton High School '14
Investigating box turtle health and communicating findings using social media
Mentor: Dr. Stephen Blake, visiting scientist, Biology Department

Andrew Feltmann, St. Francis Borgia High School '14
Removal of an invasive species, bush honeysuckle, increases deer usage but only in unburned habitats
Mentor: Dr. Raelene Crandall, Biology Department

George Garner, Ladue Horton Watkins High School '15
Removal of an invasive species, garlic mustard, influences recruitment of woody plants
Mentor: Dr. Raelene Crandall, Biology Department

Leyna Stemle, Marquette High School '14
Plant extinctions in newly restored glades can be attributed to stochastic processes
Mentors: Holly Bernardo and Dr. Tiffany Knight, Biology Department

Clayton Hillermann, Eureka High School '15
Hannah Walkowski, Fort Zumwalt North High School '15
Effect of soil variation on tree species diversity in a forest community
Mentors: Maranda Walton and Dr. Jonathan Myers, Biology Department

Ellen Sulser, Kirkwood High School '14
Adam Vorel, Eureka High School '15
Die-off and recruitment of tree multi-stems after drought
Mentors: Maranda Walton and Dr. Jonathan Myers, Biology Department

Maddie Willis, Marquette High School '14
Rodents show preference for seeds of certain native glade species
Mentors: Holly Bernardo and Dr. Tiffany Knight, Biology Department

Hannah Kruse, Fort Zumwalt North High School '15
Fire increases invasive species germination but not survivorship
Mentors: Erynn Maynard and Dr. Tiffany Knight, Biology Department

Courtney Vishy, Francis Howell High School '14
Anthropogenic disturbance increases exotic species abundance
Mentors: Erynn Maynard and Dr. Tiffany Knight, Biology Department

Thoman Van Horn, Thomas Jefferson School '14
Fire effects on herbivory of invasive plant species
Mentors: Erynn Maynard and Dr. Tiffany Knight, Biology Department

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